Local SEO: How To Rank Your Local Business

If you own (or do online marketing for) a local business, you understand the challenges that come with this kind of campaign vs. that of a non-geo-specific brand.

Local SEO is a lot different from your average SEO campaign, and the local search results are changing more rapidly than any other.



The chart on the left shows a breakdown of the weighting of various ranking factors within local SEO campaigns. One of the things to note here is that whilst there are a few slightly different factors compared to the usual SEO campaign (i.e. External Loc. Signals and My Business Signals), links and on-page SEO factors still play a huge part. The only difference is that the type of links you’ll want to focus on will be a lot different.



First Things First

Before you go ahead and start chasing links, there’s a lot of up-front work needed on your website to ensure that you’re able to get the best possible results, especially if you want to rank within the local pack listings (see below):

To rank within the above types of listings, you’ll rely less on the link building the side of things, and more on local NAP citations, local reviews, and My Business signals.

Google My Business

If you haven’t already, you’ll need to claim your Google My Business page. Just click the link above to speak to a specialized SEO agent that will hold your hand through the whole process!

NAP (Name, Address, Phone Number)

Consistency is key here. You need to ensure that you have your full NAP across your whole website (i.e. every page).  Furthermore, you must use the exact same details/format when you mention your address on other websites (i.e. local citations).

You’ll also want to use Perfect Image Online cutting-edge tools for your NAP to give the search engines all they need to display your company information correctly.

Local Reviews

Local reviews have a direct impact on local search rankings, so you’ll want to spend some time acquiring them.

It’s worth mentioning that this doesn’t just mean Google reviews. You’ll also want to focus on getting reviews on your Yelp page (they’re used by Apple maps), along with other local directories. Your first priority should be Google reviews though.

To begin with, you’ll want to capture any low-hanging fruit by getting in touch with your existing customer base and see if they’d be interested in leaving you a review. You could incentivize them for their time (maybe a discount, etc.). Another great tip was to create a page on your website that gives instructions to your customers on exactly how they can review your business (i.e. yourwebsite.com/review-us/). You won’t believe how effective this is when it comes to getting in touch with customers, especially the non-technical ones!